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esilient communities contain informed and empowered residents capable of preparing, preventing, recovering and adapting to natural or man-made disasters. PIE Center researchers immerse themselves in communities to identify and fill gaps in these areas. Click on the project names below to read short summaries, download final reports, useful graphics and more.

Fishing boats docked at the Apalachicola, Florida marina.

Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities

Faculty: Angie B. Lindsey
Staff: Kacie Pounds
Funded by: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

This five-year, $6.5 million project seeks to address the environmental, economical and emotional health concerns in Florida and Alabama Gulf Coast communities as a result of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. A team of biologists, psychologists, social scientists, governmental regulatory agencies, county Extension faculty and non-profit organizations are working together to determine how research can meet the area’s needs and fill gaps within the community such as public health concerns regarding seafood safety, mental health, social vulnerability and community resilience.

Website

 

Public opinions report

 

Dissertation

 

Webinar

 

Webinar 2

 

Webinar 3

 

Community resilience & preparedness projects

  • Public opinions of community resilience & disaster preparedness

    Faculty: Angie B. Lindsey Staff: Sandra Anderson A growing concern throughout the country is preparedness for both individuals and communities. Residents must be prepared for both natural and man-made disasters in order to ensure the sustainability of Florida’s economy and communities. In one in a series of public opinion surveys, the UF/ IFAS Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources surveyed more than 500 Floridians in January 2016 to examine Floridians' opinions and knowledge of their communities' preparedness for natural and man-made disasters. Final reportIssue guideWebinar
  • Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities

    Faculty: Angie B. Lindsey Staff: Kacie Pounds Funded by: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences This five-year, $6.5 million project seeks to address the environmental, economical and emotional health concerns in Florida and Alabama Gulf Coast communities as a result of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. A team of biologists, psychologists, social scientists, governmental regulatory agencies, county Extension faculty and non-profit organizations are working together to determine how research can meet the area’s needs and fill gaps within the community such as public health concerns regarding seafood safety, mental health, social vulnerability and community resilience. Website  Public opinions report  Dissertation  Webinar  Webinar 2  Webinar 3
  • Seafood Management Assistance Resource & Recovery Team

    Faculty: Angie B. Lindsey Following the oyster collapse in Apalachicola Bay, PIE Center researchers are helping foster and develop the citizen action group SMARRT, or the Seafood Management Assistance Resource & Recovery Team. The 15-person team includes local oystermen, crabbers, shrimpers, guides, fishermen and clammers. SMARRT works with the Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities team, government leaders and regulatory agencies.